William Golding | Critical Essay by Peter M. Axthelm

This literature criticism consists of approximately 7 pages of analysis & critique of William Golding.
This section contains 2,032 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Peter M. Axthelm

Critical Essay by Peter M. Axthelm

In contrast to [Arthur Koestler's] Darkness at Noon, which introduces one complete system, examines its collapse, and then tentatively offers another one, Golding's Free Fall presents only fragments of systems. Its hero begins with no system at all and ends with only a hint of one. Yet, in describing man's approach to meaning rather than his scrutiny of its elements, Golding examines [an] important aspect of the modern confession.

Superficially, the hero of the novel is a success, a boy from the slums who has become a famous artist and now lives on Paradise Hill. Yet he calls himself "a burning amateur, torn by the irrational and incoherent, searching and self-condemned."… Unlike most confessional characters, who are never sure what kind of perception they will find, Sammy Mountjoy clearly defines the goals of his self-examination. Foremost among...

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This section contains 2,032 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Peter M. Axthelm
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