Belles on Their Toes | Criticism

Frank Bunker Gilbreth, Sr.
This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Belles on Their Toes.
This section contains 264 words
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Buy the Critical Essay by John T. Winterich

Writing on his own [in "I'm a Lucky Guy"], Mr. Gilbreth is rather more restrained and less exuberant than the collaboration….

Mr. Gilbreth's solo flight opens with his departure for the University of Michigan, and though he is at pains to explain that his narrative "is not primarily a chronicle of my college days," some 38 per cent of his text is just that….

His Navy experiences cover only fifty-odd pages, but they are the best part of the story….

In the course of these eighteen years the author woos and wins a wife, and some of the attendant confusion suggests the hilarity of "Cheaper by the Dozen." But in the main the narrative is straightforward self-history, most of it agreeably matter-of-fact, and none of it tremendously exciting.

What heartiness and zest emerge is largely in the salt-water experiences. Mr. Gilbreth obviously had a good time in the Navy...

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This section contains 264 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John T. Winterich
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Gale
Critical Essay by John T. Winterich from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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