George Crabbe | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Hugh C. Prince

This literature criticism consists of approximately 22 pages of analysis & critique of George Crabbe.
This section contains 6,580 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Hugh C. Prince

Critical Essay by Hugh C. Prince

SOURCE: Prince, Hugh C. “George Crabbe's Suffolk Scenes.” In Humanistic Geography and Literature, edited by Douglas C. D. Pocock, pp. 190-208. London: Croom Helm, Ltd., 1981.

In the following essay, Prince analyzes Crabbe's poetry in order to evaluate his relationship with his native Suffolk.

In a history of English literature, George Crabbe (1754-1832) stands apart from his contemporaries.1 He was an Augustan poet who rhymed couplets in the manner of Pope, Gray and Dyer, but his verses destroyed the pastoral idyll and depicted village life, ‘as Truth will paint it, and as Bards will not’.2 He rejected Thomson's progressive view of the seasonal round and Goldsmith's nostalgic vision of the deserted village. The countryside which Crabbe knew most intimately was not an Elysium where swains and shepherdesses idly disported...

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This section contains 6,580 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Hugh C. Prince