The Canterbury Tales | Critical Essay by S. H. Rigby

This literature criticism consists of approximately 90 pages of analysis & critique of The Canterbury Tales.
This section contains 6,900 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by E. Talbot Donaldson

SOURCE: “The Masculine Narrator and Four Women of Style,” in Speaking of Chaucer, W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1970, pp. 46-64.

In the following essay, Donaldson examines the way in which Chaucer “simultaneously” describes events from a number of different viewpoints while apparently seeing them from a singular point of view. In particular, Donaldson focuses on four of the women who become the object of the narrator's discussion: Emily (“The Knight's Tale”), May (“The Merchant's Tale”), Criseyde (Troilus and Criseyde), and the Prioress (“The Prioress's Tale”).

Not long ago an American Chaucerian harshly reprimanded those modern critics who talk about Chaucer as if he had a complicated or difficult style such as Donne's or Pope's. Chaucer, Professor Bronson...

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This section contains 6,900 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by S. H. Rigby