Elizabeth Gaskell | Critical Essay by Margaret Homans

This literature criticism consists of approximately 47 pages of analysis & critique of Elizabeth Gaskell.
This section contains 14,032 words
(approx. 47 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Margaret Homans

Critical Essay by Margaret Homans

SOURCE: "Mothers and Daughters I: Gaskell's Stories of the Mother's Word and the Daughter's Fate," in Bearing the Word: Language and Female Experience in Nineteenth-Century Women's Writing, The University of Chicago Press, 1986, pp. 223-50.

In the following essay, Homans claims that Mary Barton and "Lizzie Leigh" are both enactments of a dialogue between mother and daughter, a dialogue that hinges on the transmission of the written word.

Central to Gaskell's myth of herself as a writer who put her duties as a woman ahead of her writing is the story of how she began to write seriously. In 1845 her ten-month-old son, William, died of scarlet fever, and "it was to turn her thoughts from the subject of her grief that, by her husband's advice, she attempted to write a work of some length."1 This work was Mary Barton, her first...

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This section contains 14,032 words
(approx. 47 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Margaret Homans
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