Leon Garfield | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Leon Garfield.
This section contains 173 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ann A. Flowers

[Leon Garfield], noted for his Dickensian novels about London, has written [with The Apprentices] an ingeniously linked series of twelve tales about apprentices set in successive months, so that the book covers one year; each tale has a relationship to at least one of the others and each deals with a different craft. Many of the stories tell of some unlikely and unexpected good deed. For instance, "The Lamplighter" is the tale of Pallcat, a dirty, stingy old man, who reluctantly takes a pathetic waif as his apprentice and, to his own surprise, becomes attached to him…. Characters appear and reappear, sometimes as major figures, sometimes as passersby. A lamplighter or a linkboy crops up in almost every story, demonstrating the themes of light and dark, good and evil that dominate the book. The sights, the sounds, and especially the smells of eighteenth-century London are vividly presented, making...

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This section contains 173 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ann A. Flowers
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Critical Essay by Ann A. Flowers from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.