John Galsworthy | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of John Galsworthy.
This section contains 1,198 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by P. C. Kennedy

SOURCE: A review of Caravan, in The New Statesman, Vol. XXV, No. 628, May 9, 1925, p. 106.

In the following review, Kennedy offers a generally positive review of Galsworthy 's Caravan but contends that "a golden mediocrity honeys and mitigates all his achievement. "

But two birds haunt the heights of Parnassus—not, as some have fabled, the eagle and the dove, but the phoenix and the ibis: the phoenix, lonely in eminence:

that self-begotten bird,
In the Arabian woods imbost,
That no second knows nor third;

and the ibis, which, as everybody remembers, is safest in the middle. There is a paradox about each of them. By the phoenix one does not mean a single literal supremacy, such as might be claimed for Shakespeare: one means the supreme quality which, wherever it is met, stands out as lord and beacon of its kind. One meets it more often in Shakespeare...

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This section contains 1,198 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by P. C. Kennedy
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Critical Essay by P. C. Kennedy from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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