G. I. Gurdjieff | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of G. I. Gurdjieff.
This section contains 6,744 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michel Waldberg

SOURCE: "Reflections on the 'Inhumanity' of Gurdjieff," in Gurdjieff: An Approach to His Ideas, translated by Steve Cox, Arkana, 1973, pp. 1-31.

In the following essay, Waldberg examines Gurdjieff's major works.

Reflections on the 'inhumanity' of Gurdjieff

The name of Gurdjieff almost always arouses suspicion or hostility. The man is usually described as a kind of werewolf or cynical tyrant, demanding much from others and little from himself, making use of his disciples for mysterious ends, seeking powers rather than virtue, and with an absolute contempt for the whole of humanity.

As for his teaching, it is supposed to be impenetrable, arid and deadening, because it contains a ruthless, 'objectively impartial' critique of human life. Because that critique is ferociously funny; because it is radical, and nothing which constitutes the human treasure escapes it; because in an allegedly Christian civilization Gurdjieff condemns the sophism whereby inconsistency is forgiven in...

(read more)

This section contains 6,744 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michel Waldberg
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Michel Waldberg from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.