Robert Frost | Critical Essay by John T. Ogilvie

This literature criticism consists of approximately 9 pages of analysis & critique of Robert Frost.
This section contains 2,535 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John T. Ogilvie

Together with "Birches," "Mending Wall," "The Road Not Taken," "After Apple-Picking," and a dozen or so other familiar descriptive pieces, "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is one of Robert Frost's most admired poems. The beginning poetry student in particular is likely to take to it, for quite understandable reasons: its diction is unpretentious and subtly musical; it presents an engaging picture and hints at a "story" without too much taxing the imagination; it is short and seemingly unambiguous. And the teacher, from his side, likewise welcomes the opportunity to present a poem that can be enjoyed purely for its visual and verbal interest without having to be subjected to a rigorous search for "hidden meanings." But, as experienced readers of this poem know, "Stopping by Woods" has a disconcerting way of deepening in dimension as one looks at it, of darkening in...

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This section contains 2,535 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John T. Ogilvie
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by John T. Ogilvie from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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