The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 37 pages of analysis & critique of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.
This section contains 10,990 words
(approx. 37 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by J. Karl Franson

SOURCE: Franson, J. Karl. “From Vanity Fair to Emerald City: Baum's Debt to Bunyan.” Children's Literature 23 (1995): 91-114.

In the following essay, Franson discusses the possible influence of John Bunyan's allegory Pilgrim's Progress on Baum's writing of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

My interest in a possible “confluence of reminiscences” affecting the creation of L. Frank Baum's Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) began (like the curiosity of Lowes regarding Coleridge's imaginative vision) with “a strange footprint caught sight of accidentally just off the beaten track” that became “an absorbing adventure along the ways which the imagination follows in dealing with its multifarious materials” (Lowes 180, 3). It was the beaten track itself, the Road of Yellow Brick, that led me to a major source of Baum's classic tale and ultimately a new perspective from which to...

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This section contains 10,990 words
(approx. 37 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by J. Karl Franson
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Critical Essay by J. Karl Franson from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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