Independence Day | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis & critique of Independence Day.
This section contains 1,547 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: "Stuck in the Here and Now," in The New York Times Book Review, June 18, 1995, pp. 1, 28.

[In the following review, Johnson discusses Ford's characterization in Independence Day, and asserts that "Frank Bascombe has earned himself a place beside Willy Loman and Harry Angstrom in our literary landscape."]

When we last saw Frank Bascombe, the angst-ridden antihero of Richard Ford's highly praised 1986 novel, The Sportswriter, he was 38 and about to cast himself adrift. A journalist and onetime short-story-writer, Frank was a perfectly ordinary man with an extraordinary gift for social observation. Served up in highly original language, his perceptions lifted him above what he called "the normal applauseless life" to illuminate the "psychic detachment" caused by his divorce and by his own relentless self-doubt. At the time, The Sportswriter was an entertaining CAT scan of the shellshocked American psyche. It remains so today.

And now there's a sequel. Frank...

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This section contains 1,547 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Independence Day
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Independence Day from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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