King Richard II | Food for Words: Hotspur and the Discourse of Honor

This literature criticism consists of approximately 57 pages of analysis & critique of King Richard II.
This section contains 16,921 words
(approx. 57 pages at 300 words per page)
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Harry Berger, Jr., University of California, Santa Cruz

In Richard II, Thomas Mowbray, the Duke of Norfolk, having been accused of grievous crimes and challenged to judicial combat by Henry Bolingbroke, addresses the following piece of ceremonial bluster to the throne:

However God or Fortune cast my lot,
There lives or dies true to King Richard's throne,
A loyal, just, and upright gentleman.
Never did captive with a freer heart
Cast off his chains of bondage and embrace
His golden uncontroll'd enfranchisement,
More than my dancing soul doth celebrate
This feast of battle with mine adversary.
Most mighty liege, and my companion peers,
Take from my mouth the wish of happy years;
As gentle and as jocund as to jest
Go I to fight: truth hath a quiet breast.

(1.3.85-96)

Such ritual self-representation has the obvious purpose of turning the speaker...

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This section contains 16,921 words
(approx. 57 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Food for Words: Hotspur and the Discourse of Honor