Henry Fielding | Critical Essay by James Thompson

This literature criticism consists of approximately 35 pages of analysis & critique of Henry Fielding.
This section contains 10,313 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James Thompson

SOURCE: "Patterns of Property and Possession in Fielding's Fiction," in Critical Essays on Henry Fielding, edited by Albert J. Rivero, G.K. Hall & Co., 1998, pp. 112-30. Originally published in Eighteenth-Century Fiction, Vol. 3, 1990, pp. 21-42.

In the following essay, originally published in 1990 and reprinted in 1998, Thomspon examines the importance of money and other valued objects in the context of eighteenth-century economic history. Focusing primarily on Tom Jones, Thompson suggests that Fielding's work reflects the instability of money—specifically cashas a mode of social relations, responding by valorizing land and estates as true and lasting forms of wealth.

Henry Fielding's Tom Jones (1749) tells the history of a number of lost objects which range from the foundling protagonist and his patrimony to wives, daughters, a muff, and several bank notes. The most prominent story of errant money begins with the £500 Squire Allworthy gives...

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This section contains 10,313 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James Thompson
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Critical Essay by James Thompson from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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