Henry Fielding | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Alan T. McKenzie

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of Henry Fielding.
This section contains 5,808 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Alan T. McKenzie

SOURCE: "The Physiology of Deceit in Fielding's Works," in The Dalhousie Review, Vol. 62, No. 1, 1982, pp. 140-52.

In the following essay, McKenzie examines Fielding's use of physiology in each of his major novels, arguing that Fielding's depictions of theatrical displays of passion offer keys to interpreting the actions of his characters.

As unwilling to be imposed upon as the most sceptical of his contemporaries, and with an eye for deceit sharpened both behind the stage and upon the bench, Henry Fielding developed one of the general concerns of his age into high art. He equipped many of his characters with certain passions and their attendant physiology—just enough to generate deceit, discomfort, and, eventually, discovery. The mechanism of the passions is not, I need hardly add, something Fielding invented; he relied on the...

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This section contains 5,808 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alan T. McKenzie