Personality Plus | Critical Review by The New York Times Book Review

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Personality Plus.
This section contains 458 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Review by The New York Times Book Review

SOURCE: A review of Personality Plus: Some Experiences of Emma McChesney and Her Son, Jock, in The New York Times Book Review, September 20, 1914, p. 386.

In the following favorable review of Personality Plus, the critic discusses the "fine human quality in these stories."

All those who know and love Emma McChesney—to know her and to love her being one and the same thing—will be interested in the career of the son Jock whose "yellow streak," inherited from a worthless father, caused his plucky mother so many, anxious moments. In the five stories gathered together in this volume under the title of one of them, Personality Plus, Miss Ferber tells us what happened to Jock—and his mother—when that self-confident young man graduated from college and went into the advertising business. Jock has his ups and downs, his failures and successes, but always that sunniest and bravest of women. Mrs. McChesney, secretary of the T. A. Buck Featherloom Petticoat Company, stands behind him, as big hearted and shrewd as in the days when we first met her "representing T. A. Buck." In truth, Jock's various haps and mishaps are of interest to us principally as they affect that splendid example of the modern business woman, his mother.

As in all Miss Ferber's work there is a certain fine, human quality in these stories which makes a swift and irresistible appeal. They are all so real, so instinct with the life of "that great, big, solid, safe, spot-cash mass known as the middle-class"—the class Emma McChesney belonged to and understood so well that even though there came a time when the very up-to-date advertising company declared her methods "old fashioned" and a letter "Dictated But Not Read" took some of the sparkle from her eyes and some of the buoyancy from her carriage, she was justified in the end and saved the Featherloom Company "real money—and large chunks of it," to quote T. A. Buck, once junior, who reappears in this new volume, as does Fat Ed Myers, Mrs McChesney's former rival.

There is in the concluding story a hint that the author intends that it shall be our farewell to Emma McChesney, but if this is so we trust that she will reconsider and change her mind. For amid all the more or less excited talk in praise and dispraise of the modern woman it is good to have before us so fine a representative of the type as this Mrs. McChesney, who was "as motherly as she was modern," and could help and understand her son all the better because of her own personal experiences. No wonder Jock felt that one of the biggest things he could do was "Making Good with Mother."

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This section contains 458 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by The New York Times Book Review
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