William Faulkner | Critical Essay by Kenneth G. Johnston

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of William Faulkner.
This section contains 381 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kenneth G. Johnston

Critical Essay by Kenneth G. Johnston

The sound of ticking clocks and watches often provides the accompaniment for William Faulkner's tales of decline and change in the South. A clock strikes the quarter hours in the afternoon quiet of the Sartoris mansion; Miss Emily's "invisible watch" marks the passage of time within the shadowed rooms of the decaying Grierson house; and Quentin Compson's timepiece, once his grandfather's, its hands twisted off, ticks on, adding to the sound and the fury of his final day. The sound is appropriate because, as Robert Penn Warren has observed, "the anguish of time, the tension of change," is Faulkner's basic theme. But in Faulkner's short story "Barn Burning," there is a silent clock. In the wagon of Abner Snopes, "among the sorry residue of the dozen and more movings," there is a clock, "which would not run, stopped...

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This section contains 381 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kenneth G. Johnston
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