James T. Farrell | Critical Essay by Barry O'Connell

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of James T. Farrell.
This section contains 6,759 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Barry O'Connell

SOURCE: "The Lost World of James T. Farrell's Short Stories," in Twentieth Century Literature, Vol. 22, No. 1, February 1976, pp. 36-51.

In this essay, O'Connell argues for the centrality of Farrell's vision of the Irish-Catholic experience in his fiction.

James T. Farrell can be an easy mark for a critic. His faults and his failures have often been attacked and are, as we shall see, only too obvious. Many of his some 250 short stories and roughly twenty-two novels are inferior pieces of literature and sometimes embarrassingly bad. At his best, however, in a number of the short stories and in Studs Lonigan, he renders accessible to us a world which we might otherwise never encounter. And for the Irish-Americans among us, indeed perhaps for all those Americans from an ethnic or racial minority, were it not for his voice it would be harder to take...

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This section contains 6,759 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Barry O'Connell
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Critical Essay by Barry O'Connell from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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