James T. Farrell | Literature Criticism Regina Barnes

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of James T. Farrell.
This section contains 459 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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Regina Barnes

SOURCE: "Old Master," in The New Republic, Vol. 169, No. 25, December 22, 1973, p. 30.

In this review of Judith and Other Stories, Barnes remarks that Farrell's work continues to be dominated by grim and hopelessly limited characters.

The works of James T. Farrell cannot be discussed singly. His 22 novels, 14 collections of short stories, essays, literary criticism and poetry all center on his pessimistic determinism, conditioned by personal experiences and confirmed through intense observation of the human scene. He is indeed considered by some to be the literary heir of Upton Sinclair and Theodore Dreiser through his consistent depiction of urban decay, social corruption and individual despair.

In Studs Lonigan (1935) Farrell created an epochal document detailing as no one has surpassed, the environment of prejudice, inferiority, foamy sentiment and violence of lower working class Chicago. This was succeeded by the Danny O'Neill pentalogy...

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This section contains 459 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Regina Barnes
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