Ezekiel Mphahlele | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 45 pages of analysis & critique of Ezekiel Mphahlele.
This section contains 12,526 words
(approx. 42 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Gerald Chapman

SOURCE: “Exile in Denver,” in Denver Quarterly, Vol. 21, No. 2, Fall, 1986, pp. 120-54.

In the following essay, Chapman, Mphahlele's former colleague at the University of Denver, discusses the intellectual atmosphere at the University during the author's time there.

As a young South African teacher, Es'kia Mphahlele (pronounced Emfak-KLAY-leh) was jailed briefly, in 1952, for leading opposition to the Bantu Education Act that established academic apartheid. Dismissed from teaching in government schools, he worked as a reporter and editor, then in 1957 began a twenty-year exile that stationed him and his family in various African countries such as Nigeria, Kenya, and Zambia, in Paris for two years, and finally in the United States. He studied and taught at the University of Denver during 1966–68 and 1970–74 before accepting a professorship at the University of Pennsylvania which, in 1982, awarded him an honorary doctorate in Humane Letters. During his exile Mphahlele became the acknowledged voice worldwide...

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This section contains 12,526 words
(approx. 42 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Gerald Chapman
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Critical Essay by Gerald Chapman from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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