Everything That Rises Must Converge | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 15 pages of analysis & critique of Everything That Rises Must Converge.
This section contains 4,435 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Walter Sullivan (September 1965)

SOURCE: "Flannery O'Connor, Sin, and Grace: Everything That Rises Must Converge," in The Hollins Critic, Vol. II, No. 4, September, 1965, pp. 1-8, 10.

In the following essay, Sullivan asserts that O'Connor is more successful in carrying out her themes in her short fiction than in her novels, because she is unable to sustain the images and relationships in the longer form.

The stories in Everything That Rises Must Converge are the last fruits of Flannery O'Connor's particular genius; and though one or two of them display an uncertainty that must have been the result of her deteriorating health, they are for the most part successful extensions of her earlier fiction. God-ridden and violent—six of the nine end in something like mayhem—they work their own small counter reformation in a faithless world. Flannery O'Connor's limitations were numerous and her range was narrow: she repeated herself frequently and she ignored...

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This section contains 4,435 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Walter Sullivan (September 1965)
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Walter Sullivan (September 1965) from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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