Everything That Rises Must Converge | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of Everything That Rises Must Converge.
This section contains 1,188 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by David Jauss

SOURCE: "Flannery O'Connor's Inverted Saint's Legend," in Studies in Short Fiction, Vol. 25, No. 1, Winter, 1988, pp. 76-8.

In the following essay, Jauss asserts that in "Everything That Rises Must Converge" the name of the protagonist is an allusion to St. Julian Hospitator, and that "By subtly calling our attention to St. Julian and the story of his life, O'Connor transforms this story of a tragic bus trip to the Y into an ironic, inverted saint's legend."

As many critics have noted, Flannery O'Connor's stories are populated with characters who bear symbolic names. Many of these names are so overtly symbolic that we wouldn't be surprised to encounter them in an allegory by Bunyan or Spenser: witness, among the many examples, Joy, Mrs. Hopewell, and Mrs. Freeman from "Good Country People"; Mr. Paradise from "The River"; Mr. Fortune from "A View of the Woods"; Sheppard from "The Lame Shall Enter...

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This section contains 1,188 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by David Jauss
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Critical Essay by David Jauss from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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