Everything That Rises Must Converge | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 11 pages of analysis & critique of Everything That Rises Must Converge.
This section contains 3,134 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alice Hall Petry

SOURCE: "Julian and O'Connor's 'Everything That Rises Must Converge,'" in Studies in American Fiction, Vol. 15, No. 1, Spring, 1987, pp. 101-08.

In the following essay, Hall Petry compares Julian from O'Connor's "Everything That Rises Must Converge" to the Roman Emperor Julian the Apostate and discusses their rejection of Christianity.

In a brief note published in 1978, Mary Frances Hopkins argues that critics of Flannery O'Connor's "Everything That Rises Must Converge" should desist from imposing the name "Mrs. Chestny" on Julian's mother. "No author names characters more deftly than does O'Connor, with all the deadliness of a Thackeray or Waugh but with none of the weaknesses inherent in their lack of subtlety," so the omission of a name for the mother is not an oversight but rather a statement in itself. As much as there is a studied purpose behind O'Connor's decision to give her character the generic label of "Julian's...

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This section contains 3,134 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alice Hall Petry
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Critical Essay by Alice Hall Petry from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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