Everything That Rises Must Converge | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of Everything That Rises Must Converge.
This section contains 5,181 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jeffrey J. Folks

SOURCE: "The Mechanical in Everything That Rises Must Converge," in The Southern Literary Journal, Vol. XVIII, No. 2, Spring, 1986, pp. 14-26.

In the following essay, Folks discusses O'Connor's relationship to the Southern literary tradition and to the industrialization of the South as expressed in the stories in Everything That Rises Must Converge.

To many critics, the views of Flannery O'Connor on science and technology have seemed self-evident. The modern faith in science was the extension of a Post-Reformation reliance on Nominalism, a philosophical position that O'Connor never ceased to question. More damaging than pure science, the popular belief in technology as a panacea had led the twentieth century away from religious faith and toward belief in a future paradise to be brought about by technology.

As Jane C. Keller insisted, O'Connor's empiricists had erected barriers between themselves and the recognition of the universe as the work of God. In...

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This section contains 5,181 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jeffrey J. Folks
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Critical Essay by Jeffrey J. Folks from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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