Every Man in His Humour | Critical Essay by Martin Seymour-Smith

This literature criticism consists of approximately 38 pages of analysis & critique of Every Man in His Humour.
This section contains 8,688 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Gabriele Bernhard Jackson

Critical Essay by Martin Seymour-Smith

SOURCE: Seymour-Smith, Martin. Introduction to Every Man in His Humour, edited by Martin Seymour-Smith, pp. xiii-xxxi. London: Ernest Benn, 1966.

In the following essay, Seymour-Smith considers the central themes and chronicles the history of Every Man in His Humour.

The Author

Benjamin Jonson, known by his own preference and that of posterity as Ben, was born in 1572, probably on 11 June, in or near Westminster. He was the posthumous son of a Protestant minister; soon after his birth his mother married a bricklayer. He was sent to Westminster School, where his master was William Camden, the antiquary, to whom he dedicated Every Man in His Humour. Probably he did not finish at Westminster, but was removed by his stepfather about 1589 and apprenticed to the bricklaying trade. Gibes about this followed him to his grave, and do little credit to those who made...

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This section contains 8,688 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Gabriele Bernhard Jackson
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