Evelina | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of Evelina.
This section contains 5,456 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Toby A. Olshin

SOURCE: “‘To Whom I Most Belong’: The Role of Family in Evelina,” in Eighteenth-Century Life, Vol. 6, No. 1, October, 1980, pp. 29-42.

In the following essay, Olshin contends that Evelina's “obscure birth,” not her ignorance and inexperience, is the driving force of the novel. The critic also faults Burney for failing to move past Evelina's search for a societal identity into deeper emotional territory.

In the original preface to Evelina, Fanny Burney describes her heroine and problems that confront her:

[A] young female, educated in the most secluded retirement, makes, at the age of seventeen, her first appearance upon the great and busy stage of life; with a virtuous mind, a cultivated understanding, and a feeling heart, her ignorance of the forms, and inexperience in the manners of the world, occasion all the little incidents which these volumes record, and which form the natural progression of the life of a...

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This section contains 5,456 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Toby A. Olshin
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Critical Essay by Toby A. Olshin from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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