Euripides | Critical Essay by Cedric H. Whitman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 48 pages of analysis & critique of Euripides.
This section contains 14,154 words
(approx. 48 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Cedric H. Whitman

Critical Essay by Cedric H. Whitman

SOURCE: Cedric H. Whitman, "The Scope of Myth," in Euripides and the Full Circle of Myth, Harvard University Press, 1974, pp. 104-49.

In the essay that follows, Whitman describes Euripides's ironic use of myth.

Many a green isle needs must be
In the deep, wide sea of misery.

Amid his despair at post-Napoleonic Europe, Shelley, his mind as always on human redemption, wandered into the Euganean Hills and experienced in imagination a renewal of the world's youth, by way of a hazy vision of Venetian glory reborn, or else transfigured in a final sea change. History offers no answer to why, in the Athens of Pisander and Cleophon, with the echoes of the Sicilian disaster still sounding, and the city's ultimate defeat the only realistic prospect, the poet of the Medea, the Heracles, and the Trojan Women should have...

(read more)

This section contains 14,154 words
(approx. 48 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Cedric H. Whitman
Follow Us on Facebook