Erskine Caldwell | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 63 pages of analysis & critique of Erskine Caldwell.
This section contains 17,584 words
(approx. 59 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Wayne Mixon

SOURCE: “Changing South, Unchanging Writer: Caldwell in Decline—and in Resurgence,” in The People's Writer: Erskine Caldwell and the South, University Press of Virginia, 1995, pp. 118-54.

In the following essay, Mixon argues that Caldwell's later works were less successful than his early writing because he failed to recognize major social changes in the American South.

In the course of a relationship that lasted for six years, three as illicit lovers and three as husband and wife, Caldwell and Bourke-White collaborated to produce four books, two of which dealt with people in the United States. Late in 1940, they set out on a cross-country journey that resulted in a book much different from You Have Seen Their Faces. Say, Is This the U.S.A. is a hodge-podge that lacks the unity of the earlier collaboration. Appearing when Americans were passionately engaged in debate over their country's response to war...

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This section contains 17,584 words
(approx. 59 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Wayne Mixon
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Critical Essay by Wayne Mixon from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.