Emmeline Pankhurst | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis & critique of Emmeline Pankhurst.
This section contains 1,548 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
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A review of “The Arch-Priestess of Militancy: My Own Story,” in The Nation, 99, 2580, December 10, 1914, pp. 688-89.

In the following review, the critic refutes Pankhurst's arguments in My Own Story.

Mrs. Pankhurst begins [My Own Story] with the apparently unconscious admission that “those men and women are fortunate who are born at a time when a great struggle for human freedom is in progress”; no one will doubt that when a “struggle” is on she will be eager to be there. The reader who sets out to take her good-naturedly will find the story amusing and entertaining. Mrs. Pankhurst is clever and writes with a facile pen, and she flings forth charges of “duplicity,” “mendacity,” and “perjury,” calls the judges “biassed,” Asquith “treacherous,” Lloyd George “slippery,” and both of them “scoundrels” with a grace and ease that betray practice. The numerous illustrations, mostly of Mrs. Pankhurst at the critical...

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This section contains 1,548 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by The Nation
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Critical Review by The Nation from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.