Ralph Ellison | Interview by Ralph Ellison with Alfred Chester and Vilma Howard

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of Ralph Ellison.
This section contains 5,262 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: An interview in Paris Review, Spring, 1955, pp. 53-55; reprinted as "The Art of Fiction: An Interview," in Conversations with Ralph Ellison, edited by Maryemma Graham and Amritjit Singh, University Press of Mississippi, 1995, pp. 6-19.

In the following interview, Ellison discusses his life and his views on writing and literature, specifically addressing his own works, so-called "protest literature," and contemporary African-American writers and literature.

When Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison's first novel, received the National Book Award for 1952, the author in his acceptance speech noted with dismay and gratification the conferring of the award to what he called "an attempt at a major novel." His gratification was understandable, so too his dismay when one considers the amount of objectivity Mr. Ellison can display toward his own work. He felt the state of U.S. fiction to be so unhappy that it...

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This section contains 5,262 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Interview by Ralph Ellison with Alfred Chester and Vilma Howard
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Literature Criticism Series
Interview by Ralph Ellison with Alfred Chester and Vilma Howard from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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