Edward Albee | Interview with Albee (1996)

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of Edward Albee.
This section contains 2,860 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Interview with Albee (1996)

Interview with Albee (1996)

SOURCE: An interview with Edward Albee by Richard Farr, in The Progressive, Vol. 60, No. 8, August 1996, pp. 39-41.

In this conversation, Albee discusses the social and political content in his plays.

Despite wealthy adoptive parents who sent him to exclusive schools like Choate, Valley Forge, and Trinity College, playwright Edward Albee didn't have an easy start. He was expelled from most of the schools, or expelled himself. At eighteen he expelled himself from his parents' home and spent a decade drifting in and out of casual jobs.

He was a messenger for Western Union when, at twenty-nine, he wrote an angry, deeply disturbing one-act play called The Zoo Story, in which a businessman on a park bench is coerced into stabbing a vagrant.

The play was a sensation, the critics hailed it as the first work of a hugely original talent, and Albee went on...

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This section contains 2,860 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Interview with Albee (1996)