Allan W. Eckert | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Allan W. Eckert.
This section contains 122 words
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Mr. Eckert's folk fable of a small boy who can talk to furred and feathered friends ["Incident at Hawk's Hill"] is part of an apocrypha that has intrigued chroniclers before Romulus met Remus. It is still intriguing if you are willing to check your skepticism at the prologue, and pad along behind a 6-year-old named Ben…. Ben's interlude concerns his life with a female badger. A natural historian …, Mr. Eckert makes this formidable beast seem appealing, without recourse to undue anthropomorphism. Ben is also a winsome protagonist—and the two make elemental music together.

Martin Levin, "Reader's Report: 'Incident at Hawk's Hill'," in The New York Times Book Review (© 1971 by The New York Times Company; reprinted by permission), May 23, 1971, p. 47.

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This section contains 122 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Martin Levin
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Critical Essay by Martin Levin from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.