Lawrence Durrell | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Lawrence Durrell.
This section contains 566 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stephen Bann

[Among the English novelists who] have continually raised the stakes of a purely artistic ambition, Lawrence Durrell holds a secure and honourable place. The dedication of Constance, or Solitary Practices to 'Anais' and 'Henry' (and indeed to 'Joey') indicates the cosmopolitan range of his affiliations. Its last chapter, 'The City's Fall', evokes a dialogue with historiography which has become ever more explicit. The great French historian, Fernand Braudel, cited Durrell in the provocative conclusion to his study of the Mediterranean world, illustrating his concept of the longue durée with Durrell's claim that the Greek fisherman of today enables us to understand Odysseus. The last chapter of Constance reverts to this image of historical stasis. 'For the historian everything becomes history, there are no surprises, for it repeats itself eternally, of that he is sure.' As the German troops retire from Avignon in the closing stages of...

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This section contains 566 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stephen Bann
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Gale
Critical Essay by Stephen Bann from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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