Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Ephraim Peabody

This literature criticism consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis & critique of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself.
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Critical Essay by Ephraim Peabody

SOURCE: "Narratives of Fugitive Slaves," in Critical Essays on Frederick Douglass, edited by William L. Andrews, G. K. Hall & Co., 1991, pp. 24-7.

In the following essay, originally published in 1849, Peabody favorably assesses Douglass's Narrative as among the most remarkable productions of the age, but observes that the author's mode of speech is prone to "violent and unqualified statements" that could "diminish his power as an advocate of the antislavery cause."

America has the mournful honor of adding a new department to the literature of civilization,—the autobiographies of escaped slaves. . . . The subjects of two of these narratives, Frederick Douglass and Josiah Henson, we have known personally, and, apart from the internal evidence of truth which their stories afford, we have every reason to put confidence in them as men of veracity...

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This section contains 1,729 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ephraim Peabody