Don Juan | Critical Essay by Rolf P. Lessenich

This literature criticism consists of approximately 55 pages of analysis & critique of Don Juan.
This section contains 16,392 words
(approx. 55 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Rolf P. Lessenich

Critical Essay by Rolf P. Lessenich

SOURCE: Lessenich, Rolf P. “The Danger and Vanity of Human Passions.” In Lord Byron and the Nature of Man, pp. 57-98. Köln: Böhlau Verlag, 1978.

In the following essay, Lessenich explores Byron's characterization of love and war as vain and perilous pursuits, designed to tempt death.

A) the Danger and Vanity of Love

Though, in Byron's work, love and military glory appear as contrary passions with contrary moral values, they have this in common: their pursuit is both vain and dangerous.

The sufferings of Mazeppa, tied up and turned away on a wild horse, are too obviously reminiscent of the sufferings of the Ancient Mariner to escape notice1. But, unlike Coleridge's bird-slaughterer, Byron's hero suffers for loving, not for killing2. To the old scarred and battle-steeled soldier Mazeppa passing...

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This section contains 16,392 words
(approx. 55 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Rolf P. Lessenich
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