Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 33 pages of analysis & critique of Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield.
This section contains 9,749 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Daniel R. Schwarz

SOURCE: "From Immersion to Reflection: Romance and Realism in Henrietta Temple and Venetia" in Disraeli's Fiction, Macmillan, 1979, pp. 55-77.

In the following excerpt, Schwarz defends Henrietta Temple and Venetia against charges that the novels lack aesthetic value and are discontinuous with Disraeli's other works.

I

The only book-length critical study of Disraeli's novels, Richard A. Levine's Benjamin Disraeli, criticises Henrietta Temple (1836) and Venetia (1837) because of their supposed objectivity:

In the final analysis, however, [Henrietta Temple] is neither typical nor meaningful in Disraeli's canon; for it carries within it few ideas or authorial observations, and Disraeli's fundamental interests for us are as a novelist of ideas and as a writer of personal involvement and observation. In Henrietta Temple and Venetia, Disraeli stands at some distance from his creations and produces two relatively impersonal works. His effectiveness for us is thereby lessened.1

My argument in this chapter will take issue...

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This section contains 9,749 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Daniel R. Schwarz
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Critical Essay by Daniel R. Schwarz from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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