The Comedy of Errors | Jonathan Hall

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of The Comedy of Errors.
This section contains 5,768 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
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Jonathan Hall

"Mercantilism and Desire in The Comedy of Errors," in Anxious Pleasures: Shakespearean Comedy and the Nation-State, Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1995, pp. 39-52.

Here, Hall investigates Shakespeare 's mercantile metaphors of desire and their relation to the construction of personal identity in The Comedy of Errors.

The advent of mercantile capitalism should not be understood as a purely "economic" transition, if by that term we mean the severely delimited and specialized set of theories and practices characteristic of the epoch of bourgeois hegemony. The later "science" of political economy tends (naturally, as it now seems to us) to obscure its own basis in an alienation of the practices of monetary power and rationalized administration from all other social interrelations and cultural practices. It is constituted as an impersonal science precisely through a "forgetting" of its nonetheless persistent and real connections with the politics of the everyday, that...

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This section contains 5,768 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Jonathan Hall