Robinson Crusoe | Critical Essay by Leopold Damrosch, Jr.

This literature criticism consists of approximately 19 pages of analysis & critique of Robinson Crusoe.
This section contains 5,622 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Leopold Damrosch, Jr.

Critical Essay by Leopold Damrosch, Jr.

SOURCE: "Myth and Fiction in Robinson Crusoe," in God's Plots & Man's Stories: Studies in the Fictional Imagination from Milton to Fielding, The University of Chicago Press, 1985, pp. 187-212.

In the following excerpt, Damrosch considers Robinson Crusoe's "desacralizing" of the world, which in the novel becomes a workplace of men and an equivocal Providence.

Mimesis, Allegory, and the Autonomous Self

In 1719, at the age of fifty-nine, the businessman, pamphleteer, and sometime secret agent Daniel Defoe unexpectedly wrote the first English novel. The affinities of Robinson Crusoe with the Puritan tradition are unmistakable: it draws on the genres of spiritual autobiography and allegory, and Crusoe's religious conversion is presented as the central event. But this primal novel, in the end, stands as a remarkable instance of a work that gets away from its author, and gives expression to attitudes...

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This section contains 5,622 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Leopold Damrosch, Jr.