Robinson Crusoe | Critical Essay by Virginia Ogden Birdsall

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of Robinson Crusoe.
This section contains 6,814 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Virginia Ogden Birdsall

Critical Essay by Virginia Ogden Birdsall

SOURCE: "Robinson Crusoe: A Miserable and Almost Hopeless Condition," in Defoe's Perpetual Seekers: A Study of Major Fiction, Bucknell University Press, 1985, pp. 24-49.

In the following excerpt, Birdsall discusses Crusoe's realization that there can be no wholly successful defense against the human predicament of living in a hostile world.

Robinson Crusoe is indeed a success story of the sort several recent critics have described. Crusoe becomes master of his fate, bending even God or Providence to his will. He is a victorious rebel against restriction. He controls his circumstances. But in thinking of our actual experience of the adventures of Robinson Crusoe, we must surely acknowledge something a little wrong about all this. For if we take Crusoe's early and continuing defiance of his limitations to have a symbolic suggestiveness, we come abruptly to an inescapable realization...

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This section contains 6,814 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Virginia Ogden Birdsall