Death in Venice | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 15 pages of analysis & critique of Death in Venice.
This section contains 4,206 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Carrie Zlotnick-Woldenberg

SOURCE: Zlotnick-Woldenberg, Carrie. “An Object-Relational Interpretation of Thomas Mann's Death in Venice.American Journal of Psychotherapy 51 (fall 1997): 542-51.

In the following essay, Zlotnick-Woldenberg applies object-relational theory to Death in Venice.

Gustave Aschenbach, the protagonist of Thomas Mann's tragic novella, Death in Venice, is a middle-aged acclaimed writer, who seemingly has been leading a rather conventional life. Upon noticing an exotic looking man near a Munich cemetery, he has a sudden impulse to travel. He winds up in Venice, a city with a warmer climate than Munich's, both in the literal and symbolic sense. There he becomes obsessed with Tadzio, a fourteen-year-old boy. Aschenbach follows him everywhere and thinks of little else. When soon thereafter, he learns of a cholera epidemic in Venice, which the authorities have tried to conceal from the tourists, not only does he not leave but he also fails to warn the boy's mother of...

(read more)

This section contains 4,206 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Carrie Zlotnick-Woldenberg
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Carrie Zlotnick-Woldenberg from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook