George Eliot | Edward T. Hurley

This literature criticism consists of approximately 9 pages of analysis & critique of George Eliot.
This section contains 2,401 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Edward T. Hurley

Edward T. Hurley

SOURCE: "Death and Immortality: George Eliot's Solution," in Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Vol. 24, No. 2, September, 1969, pp. 222-6.

In the following essay, Hurley contends that George Eliot's characters seek immortality through the family rather than through religion.

If the novelist seeks to explain life, one of the things he must also explain is death. The question of life is, how am I to satisfy my desire to live? Given a historical realization of death, the desire to live must somehow accommodate the challenge that apparently ends that life and frustrates the desire. Thus each change in man's explanation of life has been accompanied by a change in his explanation of death, and each literature has its distinctive approach to death as well as to life.1 No literary period since the Elizabethan had its inherited explanation of life challenged so profoundly as the Victorian, and it is natural...

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This section contains 2,401 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Edward T. Hurley
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