Walt Whitman | Critical Essay by David Cavitch

This literature criticism consists of approximately 15 pages of analysis & critique of Walt Whitman.
This section contains 4,201 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by David Cavitch

SOURCE: “The Lament in ‘Song of the Broad-Axe,’” in Walt Whitman: Here and Now, edited by Joann P. Krieg, Greenwood Press, 1985, pp. 125-35.

In the following essay, Cavitch discusses Whitman's attempt to come to terms with his father's death and with his mother's self-centeredness in his “Song of the Broad-Axe.”

Within a week after the first publication of Leaves of Grass, in which Whitman was proclaiming himself the liberator of all the downtrodden spirits in the world, the poet's begrudging father died on July 11, 1855, as if erased by his inspired son's declarations of independence. He had been seriously ill for a few years, partly paralyzed, according to one newspaper obituary notice, and he had suffered so many “bad spells,” as Mrs. Whitman called them, that on...

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This section contains 4,201 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by David Cavitch