Death Comes for the Archbishop | Critical Essay by Ann W. Fisher-Wirth

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of Death Comes for the Archbishop.
This section contains 6,972 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Ann W. Fisher-Wirth

SOURCE: “Dispossession and Redemption in the Novels of Willa Cather,” in Cather Studies, Vol. 1, 1990, pp. 36-54.

In the following essay, Fisher-Wirth categorizes Death Comes for the Archbishop as the fifth in the series of Cather's novels—including My Ántonia, A Lost Lady, The Professor's House, and My Mortal Enemy—that deal with issues of fall and redemption.

Man was lost and saved in a garden.

—Willa Cather, Death Comes for the Archbishop

Death Comes for the Archbishop is an anomaly in Willa Cather's fiction. Massive, serene, and luminous, it is scarcely a novel at all; it lacks the novel's defining feature, psychological development and change. Nor does the book have much conflict. Moments of danger in the present end as soon as they begin.1 Episodes of suspense or terror...

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This section contains 6,972 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ann W. Fisher-Wirth
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