Death Comes for the Archbishop | Critical Essay by D. H. Stewart

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of Death Comes for the Archbishop.
This section contains 5,147 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by D. H. Stewart

Critical Essay by D. H. Stewart

SOURCE: “Cather's Mortal Comedy,” in Queen's Quarterly, Vol. LXXIII, No. 2, Summer, 1966, pp. 244-59.

In the following essay, Stewart argues that Cather borrowed heavily from Puvis de Chavannes's series of frescoes of the life of Saint Genevieve and Holbein's “Dance of Death” woodcuts in her composition of Death Comes for the Archbishop.

The importance of Willa Cather's Death Comes for the Archbishop is that it is one of the most elaborately contrived novels ever fashioned by an American, rivalling in artistic allusiveness Eliot's Wasteland and in technical complexity Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! So adroit had she become, however, in the practice of her much publicized “démeublé form” that she could use it as mere façade. Behind its plain face she...

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This section contains 5,147 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by D. H. Stewart
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