Reading in the Dark | Critical Review by Edward Conlon

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of Reading in the Dark.
This section contains 1,287 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: "Violent Griefs and Seductive Hopes," in The New Leader, Vol. LXXX, No. 14, September 8, 1997, pp. 16-17.

In the following review, Conlon compares the autobiographical elements of Reading in the Dark to those of Frank McCourt's Angela's Ashes, finding Deane's novel representative of a more general Irish identity than McCourt's.

The word "mystery" derives from a Greek term for someone who kept his mouth shut: an initiate into the sacred rites and transcendent experiences of the ancient world. To outsiders, such individuals were distinguished by their refusal to speak of their secrets. So a mystery became what we don't understand, whether in the secular realm or the holy. Both are explored in Reading in the Dark a first novel about an Irish childhood by the eminent scholar and critic Seamus Deane.

As with many first novels, generous helpings of autobiographical material not only lend an emotional...

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This section contains 1,287 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Edward Conlon
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Critical Review by Edward Conlon from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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