D. H. Lawrence | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 34 pages of analysis & critique of D. H. Lawrence.
This section contains 8,997 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Merle R. Rubin

SOURCE: Rubin, Merle R. “‘Not I, but the Wind That Blows through Me’: Shelleyan Aspects of Lawrence's Poetry.” Texas Studies in Literature and Language 23, no. 1 (spring 1981): 102-22.

In the following essay, Rubin discusses parallels between the poetry of D. H. Lawrence and the works of English Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822).

Despite Lawrence's strenuous denials of influence, specific influences upon his poetry are clearly discernible. In addition to Whitman, Wordsworth, and Blake,1 other influences were the King James Bible, the Nonconformist hymns of Lawrence's chapel youth, and the poetry of the Pre-Raphaelites, Swinburne, and Hardy. The early love poems are faintly Pre-Raphaelite in their vivid attention to color and detail and more than faintly Swinburnian in their plangent use of small, simple words (“sweet,” “cool,” “pain,” “ache,” “darkness,” “moon,” “sun”). This strain in turn is traceable to the major tradition of English Romanticism,2 and more specifically a...

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This section contains 8,997 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Merle R. Rubin
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Critical Essay by Merle R. Rubin from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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