David Hare | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 26 pages of analysis & critique of David Hare.
This section contains 6,933 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John J. Su

SOURCE: “Nostalgic Rapture: Interpreting Moral Commitments in David Hare's Drama,” in Modern Drama, Vol. XL, No. 1, Spring, 1997, pp. 23-37.

In the following essay, Su examines Hare's sentimental vision of an idealized British past and its underlying function as a point of reference for interpreting contemporary political realities and moral conflicts.

A deep, if problematic, nostalgia for the Great Britain of World War II suffuses the work of British playwright David Hare. Susan Traherne’s exuberant cry at the end of Plenty, “There will be days and days and days like this,” exemplifies Hare’s troubled nostalgia: the promise of social equality and national renewal with the war’s end presented as the final memory of a fragmenting psyche.1 Hare identifies himself both personally and artistically in terms of World War II: “I was born in 1947, and it makes me sad to think that mine may be the last...

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This section contains 6,933 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John J. Su
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Critical Essay by John J. Su from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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