Daisy Miller | Critical Essay by Carol Ohmann

This literature criticism consists of approximately 14 pages of analysis & critique of Daisy Miller.
This section contains 4,127 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Carol Ohmann

SOURCE: "Daisy Miller: A Study of Changing Intentions," in American Literature, Vol. XXXVI, No. 1, March, 1964, pp. 1-11.

In the following essay, Ohmann analyzes James's portrayal of Daisy Miller, contending that his attitude toward his protagonist changes over the course of the novella.

Henry James's most popular nouvelle seems to have owed its initial prominence as much to the controversy it provoked as to the artistry it displayed. Daisy Miller caused a bitter dispute in the customarily urbane dining room of Mrs. Lynn Linton; it gave American writers of etiquette a satisfying opportunity to chastise native mothers and daughters (Daisy should have had a chaperone; dear reader, take heed); it brought Henry James himself, while he sat in the confines of a Venetian gondola, a round scolding from a highly articulate woman of the cosmopolitan world. The causes of argument, of course, were the character of...

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This section contains 4,127 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Carol Ohmann
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Critical Essay by Carol Ohmann from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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