Cynthia Ozick | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of Cynthia Ozick.
This section contains 5,552 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Janet L. Cooper

SOURCE: Cooper, Janet L. “Triangles of History and the Slippery Slope of Jewish American Identity in Two Stories by Cynthia Ozick.” MELUS 25, no. 1 (spring 2000): 181–195.

In the following essay, Cooper examines Ozick's characterizations in her fiction.

Cynthia Ozick's fiction is filled with characters in a state of identity crisis: “pagan rabbis,” Holocaust survivors, and frustrated artists who are struggling against the continual pressure of being Jewish in a hostile Christian environment. Not only do these characters stumble through America like “inevitable exiles” (Kielsky 23), but they are extremely conscious of their struggle and think a great deal about who they are in relation to those around them (Walden 2). Therefore, it is virtually impossible to read one of Ozick's texts without thinking a great deal about Jewish American identity.

Ozick's message, however, often is not clear; her texts are tightly condensed and often difficult, especially for the non-Jewish reader. Rather than...

(read more)

This section contains 5,552 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Janet L. Cooper
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Janet L. Cooper from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.