Cymbeline | Literature Criticism E.A.M. Colman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 9 pages of analysis & critique of Cymbeline.
This section contains 2,557 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
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E.A.M. Colman

SOURCE: "The Language of Sexual Revulsion," in The Dramatic Use of Bawdy in Shakespeare, Longman Group Limited, 1974, pp. 112-42.

In this excerpt, Colman suggests that the dark bawdiness of Cymbeline places it in the tradition of Othello, King Lear, and Timon, of Athens, rather than with the other Shakespearean romances,

From most critical viewpoints, Cymbeline fits tidily into the place that chronology gives it, among Shakespeare's last plays. Recent editors have hazarded guesses of 1608 or 1609 as its most probable time of composition,22 and it has long been regarded as a companion piece to its close successor or contemporary, The Winter's Tale, Like both The Winter's Tale and Pericles, it has a plot that belongs in the romance genre, and many of its underlying concerns—loyalty, chastity, separation, remorse, reconciliation—are shared with The Tempest also...

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This section contains 2,557 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the E.A.M. Colman