E. E. Cummings | Critical Essay by Norman Friedman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of E. E. Cummings.
This section contains 1,445 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Norman Friedman

Critical Essay by Norman Friedman

In the 1920s Cummings was known as a conspicuous member of the avant-garde, an arch-experimentalist, a modernist, and a bohemian. The New Criticism, which was just beginning to germinate in the writings of T. E. Hulme, Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, and I. A. Richards, had not yet noticed any serious discrepancy between its own principles and the writings of Cummings. The real hostility he aroused was among the antimodernists … and, in later decades, critics such as John Sparrow and Ivor Winters—men who were attacking Pound and Eliot as well. There is no real problem here, for, while it cannot be said that the critics, favorable or otherwise, really understood what Cummings was about, neither can it be said that he himself had altogether found his way. It was suspected—and it was probably partly the...

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This section contains 1,445 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Norman Friedman